Category Archives: Green-tech

First Sweden-China Entrepreneur Conference held in Shenzhen fruitful

STOCKHOLM, Nov. 20(Greenpost)—The first Sweden-China Entrepreneurs Match Making seminar held in Shen Zhen on Nov. 17 was very fruitful.

 

Many Swedish companies including Nordic Innovation Center,  Bayn Europe AB and Highlands Uptown AB and Sweden-China Entrepreneur Association have presented their companies, met their Chinese counterparts and signed agreements with them for future cooperation.

At the forum focusing on belt and road initiative, Gao Sinuo, Shenzhen Investment Promotion Agency said that Shenzhen is an innovative and open city and the bridge in connection to the outside world. Shenzhen is a cosmopolitan with greatest potential to invest.

Patrik Edström from Bayn Europe AB said his company is engaged in studying sugar reduction solutions at various chain. It was established in 2009 and was in public listing in Nasdaq in 2014.

Anders Berg, CEO of Highlander Uptown AB said they are going to build a financial IT platform and can help financial institutions to lower their cost by 90 percent and give good returns for private savings.

Agreements signed during the conference

Three agreements have been signed during the Swedan China Entrepreneur meeting.

Zhang Qiaozhen, President of Sweden-China Entrepreneur Association and Zhang Kao, Secretary of Huaya Center signed MOU, Patrik Edström of Bayn Europe AB signed agreement with Zhang Luping, General Manager of Kongwah Real Estate Group on studying of sugar reduction.

Leif Anders Berg signed agreement with Zhang Shenhua, President  of Shenzhen Xinyu Fund Management Co.ltd.

Zhang Qiaozhen thinks this signing of agreements between Swedish and Chinese enterprises is due to  a two year efforts. Sweden-China Entrepreneur Association and Bayn Europe AB signed agreement to cooperate in lowering sugar for good health. Karolinska Cancer research project and Finteck Financial management project have been a sign that the two projects have been in contact and cooperation with their Chinese counterparts.

Trade talks between the two sides

Ai Xuefeng, Vice Mayor of Shenzhen led his colleagues Qiu Xuan, Gao Lin, Sun Huaizhong, Wang Youming and Chen Guangwen from Shenzhen government came to talk with the Swedish companies led by Olle Zetterberg, Director of Business Sweden, Ulf Borbos of North European Innovation Center, Leif Anders from Highlander Uptown AB, Zhang Qiaozhen , President of  Sweden-China Entrepreneur Association and Zhang Luping, General Manager of Kongwah Real Estate Group.

Ai Xuefeng made an introduction about Shenzhen’s economic development and its strategic role in belt and road initiative.

He welcome Swedish entrepreneurs to invest in Shenzhen.

Olle Zetterberg said he was very  glad to come to beautiful Shenzhen and willing to cooperate with China. Sweden has a lot of high tech which can have great potential in China. Sweden-China Entrepreneur Association gave us a good beginning in bringing Swedish technology into China.

Zhang Qiaozhen held that although Sweden is the first country that established diplomatic relations with China, due to historical and cultural differences, there is still lack of understanding between the two sides. That is why Sweden-China Entrepreneur Association came into being. Its headquarter is in Stockholm. Over the past two years, the association is engaged in projects in high-tech, environmental protection, energy saving, clean energy and electronics. So far it has helped 105 high-tech enterprises and provided incubation platform for dozens of companies.

Thanks to the Chinese government’s free booth of High-Tech fair, Sweden-China Entrepreneur Association help many enterprises to attend this exhibition. Her association will continue to  exert an important role in providing good bridge for the two sides.

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On Nov.18, Zetterberg and other Nordic Entrepreneurs were invited to visit the headquarters of the Kongwah Real Estate Group which covers a total of 30 thousand square meters in 16 storeys. The two sides discussed the establishment of Shenzhen Nordic Innovation Center and Incubator.

Zhang Luping also presented the company’s development plan and structure,hoping more European High-Tech enterprises can end up in Shenzhen.

Translated and edited by Xuefei Chen Axelsson.  Photo by Mao Zhiliang .

Chinese Special Series–Fast train can benefit the whole world

Stockholm, Nov. 12(Greenpost) — When China built fast train in 2008, I was astonished by Chinese accurate drivers and fantastic services in the Hexiehao or Harmony Train.

I used to take more than 8 hours from Beijing to Jinzhou by train. Now I fly back from Stockholm to Beijing by airplane through 8.5 hours. So sometimes I jokingly said that Stockholm is my backyard garden from my Beijing home.

This summer we went back to Beijing again.  Surprisingly it only takes half an hour from Beijing to Tianjin and only four and half hours from Tianjin to Shanghai. It used to take 12 hours.

We travelled around half of China from Tianjin to Shanghai, from Shanghai to Suzhou, just half an hour. From Suzhou to Beijing it just took four and half hours. From Shenyang to Dalian it only takes two hours. From Dalian to Jinzhou, it also jus took two hours.

There is wifi in the waiting room in Jinzhou Station and it was terribly clean and nice.  People can buy all kinds of snacks from all over China and people don’t have to be so crowded as before.

From the very beginning, I supported the idea of developing the fast train. It is absolutely great! People think it is expansive, but it is not expansive if people consider the overall benefit it brings to the society, to the business and to people’s health as well as wellbeing.

I strongly suggest Sweden build fast train. Maybe it is a better idea to join hands with Denmark and Norway to build fast train from north to south. Think of Chinese train from Harbin to Dalian, just five hours.  It is just perfect.

Think of people taking train just from Oslo to Denmark via Stockholm or surrounding Solna or Uppsala just by four hours or from Oslo to Stockholm just one hour! It will bring a lot of human flow and it will bring a lot of vitality to our economy and people’s spirit.

Sweden has been very proud of its Tunnelbana because it starts from 1940s and the train has been very good in capacity. But now it need improvement.

I suggest Sweden use Chinese fast train technology and workers.  We shall benefit from it in the long run!

Now I do think Chinese fast train is the best in the world!

Solvatten–An Innovative Tool to Achieve Climate and Development Goals 

By Xuefei Chen Axelsson

STOCKHOLM, Nov.7(Greenpost)– Climate change is a reality and people from developing countries – specially women and children – are suffering the most. How can technology support governments to overcome these challenges?  Getting ready for the future. Credit: Solvatten. 

Here we have an interview between Analice Martins, independent writer, activist for women’s rights and founder of Internacionalidade and David Wadström focusing on an innovation called Solvatten.  The following is the details of Q and A.

Hej, David! Thanks for having me here! Can you tell me more about Solvatten?
Hej Analice! Sure! Solvatten – which means “Sun Water” in Swedish – is a jerry can that uses solar energy to purify contaminated water. After a few hours exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light, specifically UV-B, the water is free from the pathogens that cause diseases such as dysentery, salmonella and cholera. We created a durable design that stands intense heat and sunlight for many years and it has the capacity to process up to 40 liters of water per day, all we need is sunshine!

Sounds very promising! And how is Solvatten addressing global challenges such as poverty, inequality and climate change?
Billions of people still use firewood to cook, heat and boil water in order to make it cleaner. There are numerous social and environmental consequences of this practice; for instance, burning firewood causes harmful indoor air pollution, releases greenhouse gas emissions, and impact the lives of many girls and women who need to walk dozens of miles every day to fetch water and firewood.
A typical household used to spend up to three hours a day to generate energy to water needs. Solvatten saves time and allow people to pursue more economically productive activities. Additionally, decreasing firewood burns is beneficial to both the household’s members as well as the trees in the local environment.

In which ways is Solvatten supporting governments and organizations to achieve their climate and development goals?
Solvatten is both a short and long-term solution. In the short term, Solvatten is a powerful relief tool for communities affected by natural disasters. Governments and International Organizations can use Solvatten in areas suffering from water contamination. In the long-term, Solvatten has been proven to be a change maker: it empowers women, increases girls’ attendance in schools, changes hygienic behaviors, and transforms its users into true climate heroes! Families have saved thousands of hectares of forest and a million trees by using Solvatten. That is real climate Action!
 

Solvatten works with governments but also green-minded companies, please tell me more about that? 
We work in partnership with governments, local organizations and corporations to provide Solvatten to millions of people living off-grid. Since 2007, we have initiated 45 projects reaching out over 300.000 people living in more than 20 developing countries. For instance, the Solvatten CSR and Climate Project provides companies and partners an opportunity to connect social and environmental impact with their business needs. An increased use of Solvatten can also improve the way a responsible company is doing business in East Africa and other emerging markets. It can really add value to their supply chains in agro-business. 

 

Can you give me an example of a successful partnership? 
Yes, good examples are the partnerships we have with sugar and coffee grower cooperatives. Solvatten plays a key role in improving the farmer’s lives at the same time it can be a practical way to offset the carbon emissions that the business contributes to. Solvatten is also being used by corporations like Axfood, International Organization such as the UN-Habitat, and environmental foundations like myclimate. 

 

It’s really inspiring! Now, to finalize, what is your biggest dream? 

My dream is to live in a world where everyone has access to safe and clean water, just as we do here in Sweden. I also hope that Solvatten shall inspire other entrepreneurs and innovators to raise their voice and come up with great solutions to address climate change! 

New antibiotic resistance genes found in research at Chalmers University of Technology

By Xuefei Chen Axelsson

STOCKHOLM, Oct. 16(Greenpost) — Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have found several previously unknown genes that make bacteria resistant to last-resort antibiotics. The genes were found by searching large volumes of bacterial DNA and the results are published in the scientific journal Microbiome.

The increasing number of infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a rapidly growing global problem. Disease-causing bacteria become resistant through mutations of their own DNA or by acquiring resistance genes from other, often harmless, bacteria.

By analysing large volumes of DNA data, the researchers found 76 new types of resistance genes. Several of these genes can provide bacteria with the ability to degrade carbapenems, our most powerful class of antibiotics used to treat multi-resistant bacteria.

“Our study shows that there are lots of unknown resistance genes. Knowledge about these genes makes it possible to more effectively find and hopefully tackle new forms of multi-resistant bacteria”, says Erik Kristiansson, Professor in biostatistics at Chalmers University of Technology and principal investigator of the study.

“The more we know about how bacteria can defend themselves against antibiotics, the better are our odds for developing effective, new drugs”, explains co-author Joakim Larsson, Professor in environmental pharmacology and Director of the Centre for Antibiotic Resistance Research at the University of Gothenburg.

The researchers identified the novel genes by analysing DNA sequences from bacteria collected from humans and various environments from all over the world.

“Resistance genes are often very rare, and a lot of DNA data needs to be examined before a new gene can be found”, Kristiansson says.

Identifying a resistance gene is also challenging if it has not previously been encountered. The research group solved this by developing new computational methods to find patterns in DNA that are associated with antibiotic resistance. By testing the genes they identified in the laboratory, they could then prove that their predictions were correct.

“Our methods are very efficient and can search for the specific patterns of novel resistance genes in large volumes of DNA sequence data,” says Fanny Berglund, a PhD student in the research group.

The next step for the research groups is to search for genes that provide resistance to other forms of antibiotics.

“The novel genes we discovered are only the tip of the iceberg. There are still many unidentified antibiotic resistance genes that could become major global health problems in the future,” Kristiansson says.

Video: China and Sweden discuss how to further business cooperation

By Xuefei Chen Axelsson

STOCKHOLM, Oct. 12(Greenpost)– The first China-Sweden Business Form has been successfully held at the Grand Hotel in Stockholm.

Pennila Gunther speaks at the conference about innovation.

Councilor of Commerce of Chinese Embassy Han Xiaodong introduces China’s policies in investing abroad and investing in China at China-Sweden Business Forum on Oct. 9,2017.  Filmed by Xuefei Chen Axelsson.

Dialogue:  Mr. Kai Hammerich, Mr. Jöran Hägglund, Ms. Penilla Gunther, Mr. Han Xiaodong, Mr. Claes-Goran Sandström.

Ms Kär from SI talks about Sweden.

Ms. Lena Sellgren from Business Sweden talks about opportunities in growing China.

Dr. Nicolas Svanström talks about opportunities and challenges of belt and road initiative.

China-Sweden Business Forum concluded and all the board members and honorary guests took a photo together.

2017诺贝尔医学生理学奖将于2日上午发布敬请关注

北欧绿色邮报网报道(记者陈雪霏)–一年一度的诺贝尔奖发布日期即将来临。诺贝尔生理学或医学将将于10月2日在卡罗林斯卡医学院发布。

10月3日,4日诺贝尔物理学奖和化学奖将分别在瑞典皇家科学院礼堂新闻发布厅发布。

10月5日,如果没有意外应该是诺贝尔文学奖发布日。但是有时也有可能变化。敬请关注。

10月6日,诺贝尔和平奖将在挪威首都奥斯陆发布。

10月9日,诺贝尔经济学奖将在瑞典皇家科学院发布。敬请关注。

Sino-Swedish Biomedicine seminar held in Uppsala

By Xuefei Chen Axelsson

STOCKHOLM, Sept. 21(Greenpost)– Changsha National High-tech Industrial Development Zone delegation held a seminar with Research Institute of Sweden and Uppsala Bio on Thursday in Uppsala to discuss cooperation in biomedicine.

The seminar was presided over by Zhao Shouting, Nordic Chinese Sustainable Development Association.

Song Jie,  deputy director of  the Changsha National High-tech Industrial Development Zone delegation gave a brief introduction about his zone.

“CNHDZ is Hunan Province’s Silicon Valley and ranks top 10 in innovation capability. We have issued a new policy to encourage more overseas enterprises and talented people to open businesses in the zone. ”

Song said the grants can be as high as twenty million yuan every year and the total is 100 million per year.

The zone is very strong in biomedicine and really likes to cooperate with Swedish counterparts.

He said Changsha was the place that raised the first artificial baby and held the largest frozen sperm bank.

He welcomes Swedish companies to cooperate with their counterparts.  He promised that the government is just willing to provide a platform for enterprises to cooperate.

Johan Laurell gave a brief introduction about Research Institutes of Sweden or RISE. He is the marketing manager.

He said RISE includes a lot of industries including food and medicine and plays a role of helping enterprises to find their international partners.

Erik Forsberg from Uppsala Bio introduced his company which is a very famous Swedish biomedicine company.

The famous Pfizer company used to be part of it.  Forsberg said it is good to understand what kind of cooperation model will be and will bring more relevant companies to meet next time.

Jan Peter Axelsson used to work in Pfizer and now in Vascaia also introduced his company, his colleague and his own expertise. He is good at providing automatic and efficient  production method.

Zhou Wenqiang is Chief Scientist from Hunan Fangsheng Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd

Hao Zou is General Manager from Hunan Hua Rui Biological Technology Co. Ltd.

Huang Qingxi is from Central Bio-MD Valley Technology Co. Ltd

Guo Xialing is Board Chairman of Argus (Hunan) Pharmaceutical Ltd.  She said she is looking for experts in fermentation.

The two sides also discussed partnerships, cooperation model, platforms and mechanisms to deepen the cooperation between the two sides.

Photo and Text:  Xuefei Chen Axelsson

SCEA Helps Guangzhou Media Delegation Visit Nobel’s Hometown

By Xuefei Chen Axelsson

STOCKHOLM, Sept. 20(Greenpost) – A group of shooting crew from Guangzhou Media Delegation has interviewed Maria Masucci, Vice Chancellor of Karolinska Institutet and Ingmar Enberg, Professor in Infection and Cancer on Wednesday.

The delegation TV crew interviewed Vice Chancellor Maria Masucci at her office in the new Aula building beside the old buildings. The spectacular building itself is already a great scene worthy of an intensive examination.

When she was asked about why Karolinska Institutet was chosen to issue Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, Masucci said it was Alfred Nobel’s will to give this task to KI. At the beginning it was all the professors who participated in the Nobel Assembly, but later it was limited to 50 professors even though KI now has over 400 professors.

Talking about her experience of contacting with China, Masucci said that she still remember the first Chinese student who studied at Karolinska Institutet in the 1970s.  Now over 400 Chinese PhDs and Masters  have graduated from Karolinska Institutet. And more and more Chinese students are coming to study at KI.

She spoke highly of the progress made in Medical science in China and she gave the credits to the Chinese leaders who have great ambitions in science and technology progress.

“I think the Chinese government has been very wise to invest more in scientific research. It has been fantastic happening and a lot of progress has been made and a lot of students have been trained in China,” said Masucci.

She said she has been to China many times and even stayed in Guangzhou for a month long time ago.

Talking about innovation in KI, Masucci said that they have been trying to be innovative both in terms of teaching and in terms of research which was done always based on evidence.

She also mentioned Chinese medicine research in collaboration with KI.

The media crew also interviewed Professor Ingmar Enberg who is an expert in man’s infection and cancer at KI.

He said he had been contacting China for over 40 years and due to his great efforts, he was awarded as Ambassador between China and Sweden。

“Now China and Sweden cooperate more closely and mutually while in the 1970s, it was really a relation between a developed country and a developing country. China has seen great progress since mid 1990s due to the overseas students going back to China.”

Enberg said KI has taught over 400 Chinese PhDs and Masters and two thirds of them went back to China to contribute to Chinese medical sciences.

KI is a university that does research on the one side and the other side is KI hospital. So the research and clinic has close connection.

The delegation also visited Nobel Forum and the KI campus and they all felt impressed by the visit.

Luna Zhang, Executive Director and General Manager of Rongtai Investment AB and Lifu Hu, tumour expert at Karolinska Institutet accompanied the Guangzhou Media delegation to visit Karolinska Institutet and arranged the interviews.

Photo and Text by Xuefei Chen Axelsson

World Bank research shows poor sanitation and lack of clean water cause poverty

By Xuefei Chen Axelsson

STOCKHOLM, Sept.9(Greenpost)– World Bank has issued a report during the recent world water week in Stockholm titled Reducing inequalities in water supply, sanitation and hygiene in the era of the sustainable development goals.

The report calls for drastic change in the way countries manage resources and provide key services, starting with better targeting to ensure they reach those most in need, and tackling inefficiencies to make sure public services are sustainable and effective.

Guangzhe Chen, Senior Director of the Water Global Practice of the World Bank speaks at the high level panel at the opening of the World Water Week. Photo by Xuefei Chen Axelsson

“Millions are currently trapped in poverty by poor water supply and sanitation, which contributes to childhood stunning and debilitating diseases such as diarrhea. To give everyone an equal chance at reaching their full potential, more resources, targeted to areas of high vulnerability and low access, are needed to close the gaps and improve poor water and sanitations services.  This report provides  a roadmap for closing that gap,” said Guangzhe Chen, Senior Director of the Water Global Practice of the World Bank.

Offering a comprehensive analysis of water and sanitation indicators, the research spans 18countries around the world and for the first time, pinpoints specific geographic regions within countries that have inadequate WASH services. It sheds light on major disparities in water supply and sanitation services between rural and urban poor and non poor areas.

Craig Kullmann, specialist and Luis Andres, Lead Economists at Water Global Practice, World Bank. Photo by Xuefei Chen Axelsson

The research finds a particularly stark contrast between urban and rural areas. Across the 18 countries, 75% of people who lack improved sanitation live in rural areas, and only 20 % of rural inhabitants have access to improved water. This report provides policymakers with a baseline and guidance on how to better target investments to ensure that basic services reach the poorest communities and households.

In Nigeria, over 60% of the rural population live more than 30 minutes away from a working water source.

In Indonesia, only 5 percent of urban wastewater is safely treated and disposed of  and children living in communities with open defecation during the first three years of life are 11 percentage points more likely to be stunned.

In Bangladesh, there is E.coli contamination  in water in  tap as well as in pond.  In Ecuador, about a quarter of population drinks contaminated water, and in Haiti, 67 percent of people drink bad water.

Today diarrhea is the second leading cause of death in children under 5. thus water and sanitation services need to improve dramatically. otherwise we are risking the future of our children, says Rachid Bennmessaoud, country director of Nigeria.

The report stressed that the services didn’t go to the poor is due to poor implementation, not due to poor policy.

 

Video: A video interview with Kevin Rudd at World Water Week

By Xuefei Chen Axelsson

STOCKHOLM, Sept. 8(Greenpost)–Kevin Rudd, former Prime Minister of Australia and current Chairman of Sanitation and Water for All has said that all sectors should help invest in solving sanitation and water issue which is fundamental for achieving the UN 2030 SDGs.

The interview was done by Xuefei Chen Axelsson on Aug. 30  at the 2017 World Water Week in Stockholm.

Mr. Rudd talked about his relations with water and sanitation from childhood, government level and international level.  He said that to achieve the SDGs, it needs all sectors’ joint efforts because water and sanitation sector is a relatively weak one which indeed needs much more attention and efforts.

Filmed by Xuefei Chen Axelsson on Aug.30, 2017 Stockholm.

2017 Stockholm World Water Week stresses values of water

Stockholm ,1 September (Greenpost)–Understanding and recognizing the many different values attached to water is the key to more efficient use – a must as more people have to share the world’s limited fresh water. This was the conclusion at the end of the World Water Week on Friday in Stockholm.  Xuefei Chen Axelsson has more. 

Over 3,200 participants from 133 countries have attended several hundred sessions, shared experiences, and discussed solutions to the world’s most critical water challenges. The number of the people has been the highest so far.

Water is the lifeline of our civilization. Without it, there is no hope of sustaining households, industries, food and energy production, or such key functions as hospitals. Access to safe water is necessary in order to implement the global development agenda, said SIWI Executive Director Torgny Holmgren, host of the World Water Week.

“With increasing scarcity, we must recognize the many values attached to water, be it economic, social, environmental, cultural or religious. I believe that by re-valuing water, we will develop a deeper understanding and respect for this precious resource, and thus be better prepared for more efficient use,” added Holmgren.

During the week, delegates discussed all kinds of issues related to water which the theme of this year is water and water, reduce and reuse.

Throughout World Water Week, links were made between the different values of water, including its monetary value.

“I believe we will see more diverse pricing structures in the future, allowing for more economical and efficient use,” said Holmgren.

A growing global population is creating a higher demand for fresh water. Climate-driven changes in weather patterns, leading to extended droughts and devastating floods, further exacerbate pressure on our common water resources.

“Efficient use, therefore, is not an option but a must to ensure availability for all of us,” Holmgren added.

Another focus of World Water Week is the realization of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

In a filmed message to World Water Week, Amina J Mohamed, Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations, pressed on the need to accelerate progress towards SDG6 on clean water and sanitation and on all the water-related sustainable development goals.

“Today, strains on water are rising in all regions and climate change is aggravating the challenge. When water is unequally shared, or perceived to be, the risk of local and national conflict increases. We are even seeing in some cases the use of water as a weapon of war.

The priority now is to harness national leadership and global partnership to scale up action. Only by ensuring the sustainability of fresh water and access to sanitation for all will we achieve the SDGs. Let us value and treasure water as we value and treasure life itself,” concluded Amina J Mohamed.

Nomvula Mokonyane, Minister of Water and Sanitation in South Africa, stressed that we need to embrace new technologies which support our route towards the realization of the SDGs and that an appreciation must also be given to new world class technologies emanating from Africa. “We cannot afford to continue to do what we did yesterday and expect to see a different result tomorrow. We must be bold!” said Minister Mokonyane.

Mark Watts from C40, an organization that gathers mayors of cities worldwide, told World Water Week participants about the risks that big cities face from climate change and how water is key to mitigation and adaptation efforts.

“We see that water pattern disruption is often the first sign of serious climate impacts and 70 per cent of our member cities tell us that they are already seeing the significant and negative impacts of climate change. 64 per cent of our member cities face significant risk from surface and flash floods, Watts said, adding that water must be part of the climate mitigation programmes, but also a central part of climate adaptation.

World Water Week hosted an event taking stock of water in the implementation of both Agenda 2030 and the Paris Climate Agreement. Addressing the event, Hungarian President János Áder said the world needs a more focused global effort towards tackling water challenges.

Two prizes were awarded during World Water Week. On Tuesday 29 August, Stockholm Junior Water Prize was awarded to Ryan Thorpe and Rachel Chang, USA, for their novel approach to detect and purify water contaminated with Shigella, E. coli, Salmonella, and Cholera. H.R.H. Crown Princess Victoria of Sweden presented the prize. On Wednesday 30 August, the Stockholm Water Prize was awarded to Professor Stephen McCaffrey, USA, for his unparalleled contribution to the evolution and progressive realization of international water law. The prize was presented to by H.M. Carl XVI Gustaf, King of Sweden, patron of the prize, during a ceremony in Stockholm City Hall.

World Water Week 2017 was the 27th edition. The 2018 World Water Week, to be held from 26 to 31 August in Stockholm, will focus on Water, Ecosystems and Human Development

 

About SIWI

SIWI is a water institute, working to improve the way freshwater resources are governed. By combining its areas of expertise with its unique convening power, SIWI influences decision-makers, facilitates dialogue and builds knowledge in water issues, thereby contributing to a just, prosperous and sustainable future for all.

SIWI organizes the world’s most important annual water and development meeting, World Water Week, and it awards the Stockholm Water Prize and Stockholm Junior Water Prize.

Stephen McCaffrey in international water law receives 2017 Stockholm Water Prize

By Xuefei Chen Axelsson

Stockholm, Aug. 31(Greenpost)–Professor Stephen McCaffrey received the 2017 Stockholm Water Prize on Wednesday, for his unparalleled contribution to the evolution and progressive realization of international water law.

The prize was presented to Stephen McCaffrey by H.M. Carl XVI Gustaf, King of Sweden, at a ceremony in Stockholm City Hall during the ongoing World Water Week.

 In its citation, the Stockholm Water Prize Nominating Committee recognized Professor McCaffrey’s “path-breaking leadership and legal scholarship in international water law. He has made a unique contribution in three specific areas: his seminal work on Treaty negotiation; his major scholarly works, including his book The Law of International Watercourses and; his leadership providing expert legal advice, wise counsel, training and facilitation of complex negotiations with a wide range of stakeholders.”

Dr Letitia Obeng, Member of the Stockholm Water Prize Nominating Committee, said: “Professor McCaffrey is an internationally respected pioneer in water law and in diplomacy. Today’s international lawyers stand on his shoulders”.

Water flows where it will and has no regard for national or regionally drawn boundaries. Beneficial hydrological, social, and economic linkages can be fostered among countries which share transboundary waters, with their equitable use promoting peace and development.

Nearly 40 per cent of the world’s population lives in countries that share river basins. Increasing stress on water resources globally will require the reasonable and equitable use of transboundary waters. Improved management of transboundary waters reduces the potential for conflict, fosters socio-economic development, promotes shared benefits, and supports healthy ecosystems and services.

On receiving the Prize, Professor McCaffrey said: “I accept this very special award not only on my own behalf, but also on behalf of many women and men who work so hard in the field to ensure that fresh water can be brought to people in ways that do not strain international relations, but which in fact affirmatively produce win-win solutions for countries and people on the ground in accordance with law”.

Stephen McCaffrey, Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law, in Sacramento, California, is the single most respected authority on International Water Law. His work continues to influence scholars, legal practitioners and policy-makers and contribute to the sustainable and peaceful management of shared waters.

In an interview with Greenpost.se, McCaffrey said the future lies on cooperation. Only through cooperation can people cope with water issues peacefully and can benefit from cooperation.

 

“Cooperation over shared waters is becoming increasingly important, as we witness higher demand coupled with growing scarcity. Stephen McCaffrey is a true inspiration for us in this area, as well as and an important guide, through his works and his wisdom”, said SIWI’s Executive Director Torgny Holmgren.

More about Professor Stephen McCaffrey

Professor McCaffrey has been acting as legal counsel to states in several negotiations concerning international watercourses. He has served as counsel in many inter-state disputes over shared water resources, for example between Argentina and Uruguay, Pakistan and India, and Slovakia and Hungary, which have been heard by international courts and tribunals.

He has guided, often multi-year negotiation processes among riparian countries with respect to transboundary water law, for example, on the Nile, Mekong, and Ganges, some with numerous countries involved.

In earlier writings, Professor McCaffrey articulated the human right to water which was later recognized by the UN General Embassy as a right in 2010. Additionally, he has provided critical insights, linking water law to policy, conflict resolution, benefit sharing, and environmental protection over the years.

About Stockholm Water Prize

The Stockholm Water Prize is a global award founded in 1991 and presented annually by Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) to an individual, organization or institution for outstanding water-related achievements. H.M. King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden is patron of the prize.

Photo by Xuefei Chen Axelsson

2017 Stockholm World Water Week focuses on water and waste—reduce and reuse

Stockholm, Aug. 29(Greenpost)–2017 Stockholm World Water Week has been focusing on water and waste—reduction and re-use. CRI’s Chen Xuefei has attended the opening session and has details.Torgny Holmgren, Director of Stockholm International Water Institute, host of Water Week made a welcome speech on Aug. 28, 2017. [Photo: China Plus/Chen Xuefei]

Torgny Holmgren, Director of Stockholm International Water Institute, host of Water Week made a welcome speech on Aug. 28, 2017. [Photo: China Plus/Chen Xuefei]

2017 Stockholm World Water Week has been focusing on water and waste—reduction and re-use. CRI’s Chen Xuefei has attended the opening session and has details.

Swedish astronaut Professor Christer Fuglesang made the opening remarks as the session began, noting that all water- including urine – in a spaceship is recycled and reused.

Stockholm International Water Institute Director Torgny Holmgren, host of Water Week, said the recycling practice in space described by Fuglesang perfectly illustrates this year’s theme at the conservation event.

Peter Thomson, President of the United Nations General Assembly spoke at the World Water Week in Stockholm on Aug. 28, 2017. [Photo: China Plus/Chen Xuefei]

Peter Thomson, President of the United Nations General Assembly spoke at the World Water Week in Stockholm on Aug. 28, 2017. [Photo: China Plus/Chen Xuefei]

“To advance our knowledge and learn more about managing our scarce water resources, we choose water and waste, reduce and reuse as the theme of this world water week, the theme touches the very core of our daily lives, to reduce, some drastic changes will be needed by the main water users, it could be in the industry sector, energy sector and agricultural sector…”

In that sense, Holmgren said water is not a sector, it is actually a connector of all different sectors.

Stockholm Mayor Karin Wanggard said water is a circular resource and one has to learn how to reduce harm and reuse the resource we claim from the earth.

Stockholm Mayor Karin Wanggard made a speech at the opening plenary of World Water Week in Stockholm on Aug. 28, 2017. [Photo: China Plus/Chen Xuefei]

Stockholm Mayor Karin Wanggard made a speech at the opening plenary of World Water Week in Stockholm on Aug. 28, 2017. [Photo: China Plus/Chen Xuefei]

“Access to water is the most important international issue to ensure sustainable development, peace and security. Clean water is fundamental in a health perspective and secure access to it for all people and the growing population is one of the greatest challenges for the international community.”

During the opening of World Water Week, UN General Assembly President Peter Thomson also shared his reflection on the Ocean Conference held at the United Nations in New York last June and strengthened the interconnection of UN Sustainable Development Goals related to water sanitation and ocean resources.

Thomson said everything is connected and water, environment and climate change are all interrelated.

Swedish Astronaut Christer Fulgesang spoke at World Water Week in Stockholm on Aug. 28, 2017. [Photo: China Plus/Chen Xuefei]

Swedish Astronaut Christer Fulgesang spoke at World Water Week in Stockholm on Aug. 28, 2017. [Photo: China Plus/Chen Xuefei]

“Thus we must have an inclusive and integrated approach and never fall back on the failing side of past status quos, we all have something to bring to the work ahead.”

More than 2000 government officials, water experts, researchers, non-governmental sectors and students will discuss issues relating to water and waste during World Water Week which began on Sunday.

The Stockholm Junior Water Prize, Stockholm Water Prize, and Stockholm Industry Water Prize will be issued during the event.

For CRI, Chen Xuefei, Stockholm.

Source, CRI

World Water Week in Stockholm focuses on water and waste to reduce and reuse

By Xuefei Chen Axelsson

Stockholm, Aug. 28,  (Greenpost) – World leaders, water experts, development professionals, policy-makers and students have gathered in Stockholm for a week-long meeting focused on finding ways to better use, and reuse, the world’s increasingly scarce fresh water.

The opening plenary of the water week began with Swedish Astronaut Christer Fulgesang telling about his stories in the spaceship.

Fuglesang said there is a very sophosticated water reuse system in the space which can treat their urin into drinking water.  Grapes can be grown there and many advanced technologies can be used to make water use more efficiently.

During this year’s water week, people talk more about the term “water scarcity” . As more countries, and cities, experience the effects of high population pressure and less available freshwater, the interest among policy-makers, businesses, and citizens grows. The realization is there. We need to become more efficient water users. We need to make some drastic changes.

“World Water Week is a key meeting place for the water and development community; it is here that we come together and make sure that the very best ideas are brought forward,” said SIWI’s Executive Director, Torgny Holmgren.

Holmgren said water is not a sector, it is a connecter linking all sectors in our daily life.

World Water Week is the world’s biggest global annual meeting focusing on water and development. It is organized by SIWI, Stockholm International Water Institute. The Week draws over 3,000 participants from nearly 130 countries, who come to Stockholm to learn about new research results, share experiences, discuss progress in the implementation of the Global Goals, and together try to find new ways to meet the world’s growing water challenges.

The President of the United Nations General Assembly, Peter Thomson, called the world’s climate and water resources the “fundament of our existence”, and said that “Without proper stewardship of that fundament the 2030 sustainable development agenda obviously goes nowhere. Because without the fundament we can’t exist.”

“Together with the Paris Climate Agreement, implementation of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals represents the best chance our species has to achieve a sustainable way of life on Planet Earth before it is too late”, he said adding that we must take inclusive and integrated approach to involve all kinds of people and expertise together.

Sweden’s Minister for Environment, Karolina Skog said that “Sustainable and efficient management of our water and wastewater has a profound effect on all aspects of human life; economic growth, sustainable development, sustainable city planning, circular thinking in industry and in production, energy saving, good quality of our water and, last but not least, it is crucial for health and for a sustainable environment.”

Another central aspect of efficient water use, is to use less. In his welcoming speech Holmgren pointed out that it will be challenging but necessary to change large-scale water consumption patterns:

“The Week’s theme, Water and waste: Reduce and reuse, really touches the very core of our daily lives. To reduce, some drastic changes will be necessary – especially by the main water users, including industries, energy producers and the agriculture sector.”

He added that changes are also needed in how we think about reuse of water: “I think that it is very important to try and change the mind-set around waste. Rather than presenting us with a problem, we can view waste as an asset also becoming a business opportunity.”

Stephen McCaffrey, 2017 Stockholm Water Prize Laureate and a Professor in water law, spoke of the need for water cooperation and water diplomacy. He told participants that although the ingredients for potential water conflicts exist, such as higher population pressure, climate change, and much of the world’s fresh water being shared by two or more countries, studies show that water sharing is much more likely to lead to cooperation than conflict.

The grand opening plenary ends with Kevin Rudd led panel discussion on how to prioritize and financing water issue with participation of Swedish, Danish, Malaysian, World Bank, Ecuador and Ethiopian leaders.

Beginning from 1990, SIWI is a water institute, working to improve the way freshwater resources are governed. By combining its areas of expertise with its unique convening power, SIWI influences decision-makers, facilitates dialogue and builds knowledge in water issues, thereby contributing to a just, prosperous and sustainable future for all.

SIWI organizes the world’s most important annual water and development meeting, World Water Week, and it awards the Stockholm Water Prize and Stockholm Junior Water Prize.

About World Water Week: World Water Week is the largest annual meeting for water and development issues, organized by Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI). The Week brings together more than 3,000 participants from nearly 130 countries representing actors from governments, private sector, multilateral organizations, civil society and academia to shape joint solutions to global water challenges. The Week strives for equal gender participation. At this year’s Week, 46 per cent of participants are female, and 54 per cent are male.

Note to Editors:

Top story: Sino-Swedish Innovation & Entrepreneurship Centre and Representative Office of Zhong Guancun Yonghe Hangxing Science Park established in Sweden

By Xuefei Chen Axelsson

STOCKHOLM, Aug. 26(Greenpost)– Sino-Swedish Innovation &entrepreneurship Centre and Respresentative Office of Zhongguancun Yonghe Hangxing Science Park has been established in Sweden. The unveiling ceremony was held on Friday.

Anna Lindstedt, Swedish Ambassador to China spoke at the unveiling ceremony.

“Sino-Swedish Innovation and Entrepreneurship Center is a great example of such cooperation when Chinese and Swedish professionals come together with government agencies to create this platform and as Swedish Ambassador in China, I welcome such initiative in motion. We should all welcome, encourage and support the multitude platforms and initiatives taken by several levels but with different stakeholders.”

Lindstedt said more accessible and cooperative platforms are needed to fulfil the compatibility that existed between our two countries.  Last year, she also unveiled the plaque in Zhouguancun in Beijing.

Han Xiaodong, Counsellor of Commerce at the Chinese Embassy in Sweden also spoke at the ceremony.

“Innovation is one of the five development concepts in China and the Chinese government is encouraging the young people to do business creatively and driving innovation. And Sweden is very strong in innovation, so I would say we have a lot of common interest to further collaborate.”

Han hopes that the innovation centre will make more efforts to help Swedish companies to go to China and more Chinese companies to Sweden.  Last year, China imported more goods from Sweden than exported to Sweden.

Sun Shaoming said their centre will actively promote bilateral cooperation through an interpreter.

“SSIEC is the first platform built for creating exchange and cooperation in science and the technology, culture, innovation and entrepreneurship between our two countries, the center will provide efficient, convenient and high quality services for the Swedish enterprises in China and will actively promote business cooperation between the two countries.”

Lindstedt and Sun Shaoming jointly unveiled the plaque for the centre.

Several companies including China and European Entrepreneur Association signed agreements or MOUs during the conference.

Zhang Ling gave an introduction about the new centre.

Björn Elmqvist, Managing Partner, ELMSQUARED AB, Gao YONGJIE, CFO, Project Manager of Gudinna Investment Consulting, Ms. Jane Jeppsson, CEO of In-Nordic AB and Wang Kaihong were the panellists  discussing the chances and difficulties as well as cultural shocks in Sino-Swedish cooperation.

Wang Kaihong(second from right) was appointed to be the first representative of the Zhongguancun Yonghe Hangxing Science Park in Sweden.

Photo and text by Xuefei Chen Axelsson